March 18, 2009

First Frankenstein Movie Opened 99 Years Ago

The first Frankenstein film ever made was released on March 18, in 1910. The 12-minute film was thought lost for over fifty years, but a copy miraculously survived and, today, it is available for all to see on the net.

For more details about the film, see my post on The First Frankenstein of the Movies.

Watch the 1910 Frankenstein online at Archive.org.


Related:
Silent Frankenstein Movies


6 comments:

Max the drunken severed head said...

Glad to see the Edison film remembered on this date. I ogle Ogle!

BTW, your readers can see a great new Frankenstein image as the banner of my blog.

Lolita said...

Wow! Thanks for the tip!

Arbogast said...

And you were there, right Pierre?!

Howard said...

“In making the film, the Edison Company has carefully tried to eliminate all the actually repulsive situations and to concentrate its endeavors upon the mystic and psychological problems that are to be found in this weird tale."

-- as quoted in your original post (linked above).

Comments like this, quite common in the silent film era, always make me wonder what kind of bizarre, transgressive films were circulating in disreputable venues, alongside the occasional pornography (some of which survives).

If there are warnings against it, it must have existed. And we know there was hardcore porn from the era, so someone was doubtless filming nasty little exploitation horrors.

Max the drunken severed head said...

I think the "repulsive situations" refers to what genteel folks objected to in the novel and shilling shocker materials, perhaps.

No blood, no graverobbing or visits to "charnel houses, " etc.

Pierre Fournier said...

Howard: In 1910, movies, no matter what the subject (comedy, drama, action), were considered — in “good society” — as pernicious. The medium was suspect and seeing a picture show was a populist, vulgar, low class experience.

The potentially “nasty” and “transgressive” film here is FRANKENSTEIN itself, which is why the Edison Company wanted to assure the public of its good intentions.